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Monarch Butterflies In Mexico

Monarch Butterflies in Mexico Every autumn, one of the most spectacular natural phenomena can be observed in the forested mountains west of Mexico City: wintering Monarch Butterflies. Learn about these marvelous insects, their 3,000 mile journey from the U.S. and Canada, and how you can experience and be witness to the presence…
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A 1,000 Year Old Stone Structure May Depict the Creation of Earth

A 1,000-year-old stone structure in Mexico may represent how some people in ancient Mesoamerica believed the Earth was created, an archaeologist suggests. Located on the foothills of a volcano in the middle of a pond, the "Tetzacualco" (a name that can mean "stone enclosure") has been known to explorers since the 16th century. Since…
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Starting a Tradition

While walking through the many colonias, which together, make up what most of us call La Colonia, I realized just how poor many of the folks living there really are. I decided to see what I could do to help them better manage their holiday season and began starting a tradition, I hope. I asked around to find out just what they could use…
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Exotic Fruits of Mexico

This list of exotic fruits and the short description of each fruit, along with photos so that you will know what you are looking at while shopping in the markets, will get you started.  I will add to this list during subsequent issues, with the latest fruits highlighted at the top of the list. Note:  When asking for these fruits…
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Mexico Produces More Avocados Than Anywhere Else In the World

There are 57 countries that produce avocados, but Mexico is by far the largest producer with its production growing at a rate of about 5% per year. Mexico accounts for about 45% of the world's annual production. The most recent figures indicate that Mexico produced over 14 million tonnes in 2014, followed by the Dominican Republic and…
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Hand Gestures Part II (Non-Verbal Communications)

 This is one that most of us know about. It gets used more than we would like to admit. It is used to describe someone that is cheap in their bargaining tactics, spending habits and / or tipping tendencies. Yes, we all know someone that probably deserves and receives this gesture, but doesn't get the message. Just rub your elbow…

Guayabitos Theme Song

Click here to listen to Eddy Lang and his song, Guayabitos...      Voice_170822_10 Clicking on this link will download the song to your download file. Click on that download to listen. Sorry for the complicated routing.
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Mexican Hand Gestures

Mexican Hand Gestures Here is something I have been meaning to do for a vary long time and I hope you all find it amusing, interesting and of some value as you stroll the streets of Mexico. While Mexican hand gestures can be strange and intimidating, they are also very utilitarian.I will start out with this very familiar one to…
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A Different Perspective on Waiting For Our Hosts

Thanks to Susannah Rigg from the BBC for this interesting and creative article. When I first stepped foot on Mexican soil, I spoke relatively good Spanish. I was by no means fluent, but I could hold a conversation. So when I asked a local ice-cream seller in downtown Guadalajara when he expected a new delivery of chocolate ice cream,…

The Legacy of the Huichol Culture

Mexico is rich with indigenous cultures – over 60, in fact. Among them are the Huichol, which live in our state of Nayarit as well as Jalisco, Zacatecas and Durango, the latter two with minority populations. The Huichol are also known as the Wixaritari and they live in the Nayar and Yesca regions of our State. They are characterized…
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Significance of Day of the Dead Altars

Each year on November 2nd, we have the most important celebration for the dead in Mexico. On this day, people visit the tombs of their beloved deceased ones and they mount altars to help them have a good walk during the afterlife. Many of these altars are considered true works of art, as they reflect the hard work, dedication and…
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Common and Curious New Year's Eve Traditions in Mexico

Whether you plan to ring in the New Year with fireworks, a big neighborhood party or a quiet dinner with family or friends, here are a few common and curious New Year's traditions in Mexico that you may want to try: 1) Eat 12 Grapes As the clock strikes midnight, eat 12 grapes to welcome the new year, making a wish while eating…
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Dia de los Muertos Glossary

Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is a 2-day holiday in which relatives celebrate the lives of those who have passed. November 1st is All Saints' Day, when Mexicans pay homage to the souls of the children and November 2nd is All Souls' Day, when the souls of those who died in adulthood are honored. Relatives gather at cemeteries…
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Dia de los Muertos Altars in Tepic, Nayarit 2013 / Tribute to Franciscan Fray Pascual Duran Rosales

In Mexico, there is a holiday for the dead called “Dia de los Muertos” or Day of the Dead, which is held every year in the month of November. The first day of November is the day we celebrate those who died as children (Day of the Little Angels/All Saint’s Day), and the second day of November is for the adults (All Souls’ Day). Families…
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VirtualVallarta.com’s Guide to Peregrinaciones

When I first moved to Guayabitos in 2007, one of the things I noticed shortly after settling in, were the loud booms that seemed to go off at all hours of the day and night during the first week or so of December. I finally learned that the local churches set off loud firecrackers during times of celebration. For example, the holiday…
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Old Cemetery in La Peñita

The old cemetery in La Peñita is a little worse for wear these days, but nonetheless, it is still a charming and restful place. It is located on the very north end of town and is snuggled in between the beach and Calle del Mirador. Much of the destruction occurred back in 2002 when Hurricane Kenna barreled through the Jaltemba Bay area.…

Viva Nayarit: La Catrina

"La Catrina" was created by Mexican artists to make a metaphorical representation of high social class in Mexico, which prevailed before the Mexican Revolution. La Catrina is considered the symbol of death, since Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is celebrated on November 1 and 2 throughout Mexico. It is common to see people disguised…